1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. It's been bought to our attention that certain users are spamming new and existing users with links to their own websites. This is not permitted on VxON.
    Should you receive such a message, please report this using the 'Report' link you will find at the bottom of the message.
    Those users will then be dealt with accordingly.
    Dismiss Notice
  3. Use The Search Function That's what It is There For!
    The chances are that the post you are about to make has already been asked so USE the search function first! You can either search JUST this forum by clicking on the search button on the top right (under the page numbers) or click on the main search button that is on the top tool bar.
    This will save you time and stop the same duplicate posts from appearing.
    Dismiss Notice

Changing the Oil cooler on an Omega V6 - Pics to follow

Discussion in 'Omega How to and FAQ's' started by Vectrolosys, Oct 3, 2005.

  1. Vectrolosys

    Vectrolosys Club Barge VxON Regional Co-Ordinator

    Messages:
    3,468
    Likes Received:
    17
    Location:
    Bristol/UK
    Well, the Vauxhall V6 oil cooler. An interesting design, that makes good use of the space inbetween the cylinder heads. Here something akin to a minature radiator, sits quite happily, exchanging heat from the oil, with the engine coolant. The design works well, until you need to replace the oil cooler.

    Typical signs of failure start with the coolant turning brown, and exhibiting a slightly oil tinge to it. Complete failure results in clogged radiator, and a sludge forming in the header tank.

    These are the materials I would recommend purchasing. I got mine from Autovaux.

    Oil Cooler
    O rings for cooler bolts
    O rings for coolant channel bolts
    Orange gaskets for inlet trumpet mounting bracket
    Black O rings for Plenum to trumpet mounts
    6 litres of 10W40 oil
    5 litres of Anti-freeze (red or blue)
    Tin of Radiator flush
    Tube of Vauxhall sealant for this job
    One of those bathroom sealant type guns (sealant needs this to be applied)
    Oil Filter
    6 Spark plugs (you may as well do these)
    Thermostat and gasket, unless they use
    Pack of permanent colour markers

    Tools

    A good toolkit is required, with a selection of Torx and star drive style sockets.

    There is quite a bit of deck clearing in order to get to the cooler. Lets start at the front, and work our way back.

    There is a large metal induction pipe, complete with a valve, and a couple of wiring connectors. This is used for the tuned induction system the Omega employs. Around 4 6mm jubilee clips hold this on, with the left hand top pipe, having a small pipe leading off it to the back of the engine. Take the right hand one off completely, and just put the left hand one out of the way for now. I think there is also a pipe connected to the idle air control valve. Disconnect this.

    3 10mm bolts hold the metal unit in. Undo these bolts, and using one of the colour markers, you can mark which vaccuum pipe goes to where on the vacuum resevoir. A couple of vacuum pipes come up to points where they can be disconnected, just un-attach them, marking with marker pen, so you know where they go back.

    The unit and be wriggled out, I found left side up and out. Ensure all wiring connectors are undone. One is attached to the airflow meter, another to the valve, and another to an air temp sensor.

    [​IMG]

    Now you have the front of the engine bay clear.

    [​IMG]

    I them removed the idle air control valve, and sprayed in some carb cleaner, and placed it to one side.

    Prise off the ecotec cover to reveal a torx bolt. Undo this bolt and place in a box.

    Undo the three bolts on the side of the plenum, where the exhaust recirc affair sits. Recover the gasket for later.

    Undo both small coolant pipes on either side of the plenum chamber. These are used to heat up the inlet tract for more efficient fuel atomisation, and probably to stop carb icing.

    Prise up the 4 black things, to reveal 4 more torx bolts. Undo and remove these.

    Undo and remove the throttle cable and bracket. Al little pin clip holds the ball end of the cable, onto the linkage. Carefully remove and recover this for later.

    The plenum chamber will be free to move, I found a couple of wiring connectors, which I undid, cut the metal clips on the crankcase pipes, and remove this pipes.

    It's easy to get to these sitting in the engine bay, as the picture shows.

    [​IMG]

    You will now see the small pipe from that left hand hose, it goes to the fuel pressure regulator, remove the pipe and place to one side.

    I then undid the injector wiring connectors, to gain better access to the 6 torx bolts. To do this, use a flat blade to prise off the wire holder, carefully so you don't lose it. Then remove the connector, and place this wire clip back on it. It'll just click in on replacement. This does not have to be done, but it made getting to the torx bolts a lot easier.

    6 torx bolts now, use a strong magnetic probe to extract them, I just left them in the trumpet housing as I did not have one of these, and recovered it later.

    The trumpets will left, recover the bolts, and your faced with the mounting bracket. Loads of torx bolts, and this will come off.

    [​IMG]

    Now is a good time to drain the coolant and oil, if you have not already done so.

    To the back, there will be a coolant transfer channel, this transfers coolant between heads, two hollow bolts hold this on, remove and locate the unit out of the way.

    I now plugged the inlet ports with tissue, and undid the bolts holding the pipes to the oil cooler. Now I bent these out of the way, but you can undo them down at the oil filter, two 19mm nuts hold them in. This is the preferred approach. It'll allow you to at least move them out of the way. MarkDTMCalib has tried both ways, and finds the official approach actually far easier in the long run, it also saves you potentiall sheering the pipes off, which bending them out of the way could eventually lead to. He has detailed below the approach he uses, an approach I would excercise in the future.

    'I simply used a large set of stilsons on the main filter housing body, it then un-screws, a filter strap wrench should also be able to do the job.
    It requires a new seal on re-fitting.
    Should be easier on units with a metal oil filter.
    Its important to use a flair nut spanner on the pipe unions at the filter end to avoid distortion of the fastening.'


    Having the right tools at this point is essential.

    [​IMG]

    Using a 30mm socket, a universal joint style flexi joint, an extension and breaker bar, I undid the back oil cooler nut. The front one can be down with the flexi joint. This joint allows you to get into the area under the scuttle, a similar joint can be employed with removing the plenum chamber, the bolt near the back.

    Now remove each of the little star drive bolts on the cover, and remove the cover. I found right side up, and out worked best. The cooler is now exposed in all it’s sludgy glory.

    Remove the cooler.

    [​IMG]
     
  2. blotto_otto

    blotto_otto Vxon's car whore

    Messages:
    12,425
    Likes Received:
    51
    Location:
    Gods city, aka Bristol
    Drives:
    Saab 93 1.9 Tid
    very good and clear there mate! top banana:bananasmi
     
  3. Vectrolosys

    Vectrolosys Club Barge VxON Regional Co-Ordinator

    Messages:
    3,468
    Likes Received:
    17
    Location:
    Bristol/UK
    This is what the old cooler looked like.

    [​IMG]

    I mopped the area out with kitchen roll, but a far more successful approach will be to vacuum out the remaining water, using an Aqua Vac, or VAX or similar, then clean the area out completely.

    Clean the mating surfaces down, and use some white spirit (thanks Mark :) ) to ensure that the area is 100% free of grime, else things will start leaking a few miles down the road.

    Reassembly. Once your mating surfaces are clean, and you have replaced the thermostat, I placed a bead of sealant on the cover, and also round the entire edge of the cover area. Left side down and in, then in works best. I finger tightened four bolts in each corner to locate the unit, then did a spiral out from the centre to tighten, once I had placed all the bolts in finger tight. It’s best to use a Haynes manual torque figure to get the figure, and measure with a torque wrench, as a gauge, just over ratchet tight is enough, or seemed to be, best to go by Haynes on this one though.

    I placed a small bead of sealant around the oil cooler protusion, then finger tightened the 30mm nut on both. Use the new nuts supplied with the cooler. Tighten fully to specified torque figures, you’ll see the sealant splurge around the edge, but it’ll be sealed right in the centre, where it is needed. If you have bent the cooler pipes back, you need to get an assistant to force them down and back forwards with a length of wood, whilst you twiddle the hollow bolt (complete with new O rings) into the cooler. If you have un-attached them, they should go in easy. I found the front one easiest as it had most length and leverage. Next mount the coolant bar, and tighten the hollow bolts, with new washers, to specified ratings.

    Get your trumpet mounting bracket and replace those orange gaskets, then mount it on. The bolts are the same length as the ones used on the trumpets to bracket, but I found some locking compound on the bracket to block ones. Apply some of this if you desire, to each bolt, and tighten finger tight. I fully tightend in a spiral sequence.

    The trumpets are next. I placed them down, and carefully mounted a bolt on the end of my torx bit, and extension. I lowered it down with my finger pressed to it to hold it, and carefully tightened. This worked for all six, but have the probe to hand. Tighten again to Haynes specs. Plug in the injectors.
    Replace the black O rings ready.

    All this time, your plenum has been waiting. Clean out the carb cleaner, and clean the butterflies. Mount the plenum vertically and place the black ecotec bit in. Lower the plenum and tighten the bolts. Re-attach all items, replace the large item and re-connect. Put a new filter on, and fill with oil and plain water. Add your radiator flush item, and start the engine.

    I left to run for 5 mins, then I dropped the water, and flusher the header tank with water, till clear, removed the top hose and flushed the rad till clear. I re-assembled everything, and filled with the anti-freeze mixture. You’ll need to do another change in a month, to clear out any excess oil, but that should be it
     
  4. OmegaV6CD

    OmegaV6CD Active Member

    Messages:
    748
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    darlington
    why did you remove the inlet trunking mate?
    you don't need to do it.
     
  5. Vectrolosys

    Vectrolosys Club Barge VxON Regional Co-Ordinator

    Messages:
    3,468
    Likes Received:
    17
    Location:
    Bristol/UK
    Just made it more comfortable to be honest :). It hurts my back bending over to get to things in the engine bay.
     
  6. Eighth_Dwarf

    Eighth_Dwarf Infinate Improbability

    Messages:
    324
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Bristol / UK
    I'm glad you have added the pics now as I will be doing mine next weekend due to oil cooler failure!
     
  7. Captain Henry

    Captain Henry Member

    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Sutton, UK
    I downloaded a three page 'how 2' under the heading OBG (Psrt1: Engines) that very succinctly described the problem with 'goo' or 'creamy mayonnaise' in the oil filler pipe or in the coolant header tank. I have both. The symptons are exactly as described in page 2.

    To cut to the real issue, someone in the course of questions to the genius who wrote the blurb, suggested that it would be possible to put a good rad seal in the header tank that would probably seal whatever needed sealing. To avoid the need to replace the oil cooler - for that without doubt is what my problem would entail.

    I imagine some kind soul might ask the following questions. Is there any sign of the stuff on the dipstick = NO. In the oil filler tube = YES smallish amounts which disappear on a long run. Floating on the water in the header tank = YES small dollops which I can get hold of and remove. Do I have to replace water = YES about a pint everyu two to three weeks, maybe longer. Any oil leaks of any kind = NO. Oil and filter changed since 1500 miles ago with no apparent problems.

    That's it really, the engine has done around 65,000 and is as sweet as a nut. Good power always.

    Your answers gratefully received.

    CH
     
  8. gsi170

    gsi170 RWD hooner!!!

    Messages:
    284
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    stoke
    am doing this job at weekend i take it the thermostat is by the cooler?
     
  9. mr_elite

    mr_elite New Member

    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    leicester
    hi

    i'm doing this job at the wk end and i was looking over your list of bitz to purchase at the top of the page!!

    but i'm stuck on the orings bits as in how many of each do i have to get :shame:
    i.e
    orings for cooler bolts?how many??
    orings for cooler channel bolts?how many??
    Black O rings for Plenum to trumpet mounts?how many??

    the orange gaskets simple enough can clearly count them from the pic
    but the rest are tricky

    any help my freind is very muchly appreciated (y)
    cheers buddy...
    wes..(aka mr elite)(y)
     
  10. Portugal1

    Portugal1 New Member

    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Areia, Portugal
    Hi,

    Thank you for all of the above. I had an issue with my Vectra 2.5 V6 leaking water...squirting it out would be more accurate...and having worked my way down through then air intake system, injection system and inlet manifold to discover that there is an oil cooler...this page has been invaluable!!

    Personally, I think Vauxhall should give me a new cover as this one, which is supposed to be made of alloy so not rust or degrade, had a place where there were SO many impurities the coolant has corroded it's way out. However, it is costing me 27 euros from my local Opel dealer here in Portugal so I suppose I shouldn't complain tooo much....

    Perhaps a thread could be started on here and all the Vectra V6 owners sign a petition to get Mr Haynes to write a manual for the Vectra which includes the V6 engine. Whilst the Omega is similar....there are differences which have taken me a while to figure out and I am a very experienced amateur (ex-semi professional) mechanic...

    Thanks again for the detail and good work on here.
    Muchly appreciated!!
    Andrew
     

Share This Page