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How to service the rear brakes on an Omega

Discussion in 'Omega How to and FAQ's' started by Marks DTM Calib, Jun 16, 2006.

  1. Marks DTM Calib

    Marks DTM Calib Omega Tank Commander

    Messages:
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    Location:
    Nottingham
    After a number of requests, here is how I do this little job!

    First of all you need to chock the front wheels and release the handbrake, slacken the wheel nuts and jack the car in a safe manner (you need to get under it!), an axle stand should also be used for added safety.

    No remove the road wheel and place this under the sill (added safety plus its out the way).

    Get under the car and remove the heat shields which cover the hand brake adjuster, its worth spraying these with penetrating fluid before starting this job as they can often be corroded. This can be done without removing the exhaust.

    The heat shields are secured by 9 10mm nuts.

    Now slacken the handbrake cable off with a 13mm deep socket.

    [​IMG]

    Next to the rear disc. Remove the securing bolt (normally a hex type drive)

    [​IMG]

    Now, using a suitable drift, drive the pad securing pins out

    [​IMG]

    And remove the pads.

    [​IMG]

    Then remove the two caliper securing bolts (19mm)

    [​IMG]

    Support the caliper away from the work area and remove the disc. Sometimes it is necessary to back the hand brake shoes off. Do this by rotating the disc assembly so the drilled hole is at the top, using a torch look through the hole and you will see a star type adjuster. By poking a screwdriver through the hole you can rotate the star end and slacken the shoes off.

    [​IMG]

    If the disc is stuck to the hub, first clean the hub with emery to remove any surface rust. Then tap the drum section of the disc gently whilst rotating the disc until it comes free.
     
  2. Marks DTM Calib

    Marks DTM Calib Omega Tank Commander

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    Location:
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    Next we need to remove the shoe securing springs, I do this with a small ring spanner to depress the spring and poke a set of snipe nose pliers through the larger hole in the hub assembly to rotate the securing pin as shown:

    [​IMG]

    Note: Older models may have a setup where the pin secures into the brake rear backing plate, these are easily removed with a Philip's screwdriver.

    Release the handbrake cable tensioning spring from the rear of the brake assembly.

    [​IMG]

    And remove all the shoes, springs and actuating lever.

    [​IMG]

    Note: the actuating lever on early models is of a different design and can seize. On the assembly shown, it may be necessary to remove the metal spring retaining clip shown above and remove the actuator in two pieces.
     
  3. Marks DTM Calib

    Marks DTM Calib Omega Tank Commander

    Messages:
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    Location:
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    Now its cleaning and inspection time.

    Check the disc's, pads and shoes, if suspect, replace them.

    Clean the backing plate and ensure the cable pivot assembly is nice and free.

    If OK then give them a good clean, clean the inside surface of the drums and make sure there is no lip on the outer edge which would hamper fitment/removal.

    Now re-assemble.

    Grease the raised areas on the back plate where the shoes sit with some high temperature grease (I use copper slip). Then refit the hand brake cable pivot assembly, shoes and retaining springs (using the ring spanner and snipe nose plier method used for removal) and the star wheel adjuster (fully wound in). Its worth greasing all metal to metal contact points (i.e the star wheel adjuster to shoes) to avoid seizure and squealing.

    [​IMG]

    Next fit the top and bottom shoe return springs, I find it easiest to pop one end of the spring into the shoe and whilst holding the other shoe pull the spring end with a pair of snipe nose pliers and ease it into the opposite hole (you don't need to get it all the way in first time, it can easily be flicked fully home with the end of the pliers)

    [​IMG]

    Note, this shot is taken from the side

    Apply a VERY thin smear of grease to the hub assembly to stop the disc's sticking to the hub assemblies in the future.

    Now fit the disc's and secure with the retaining screw

    Note, apply a small amount of grease to the threads and do NOT over tighten it. Its purpose in life is only to hold the disc's in the correct position, the road wheel bolts are what actually clamps the disc. Finger tight is actually enough!

    Adjust the star wheel adjuster with a flat blade screw driver until the shoes stop the disc rotating and then back it off until they are just free.

    [​IMG]

    Now refit the caliper, ensure that the area where the pads sit is free, the can be a lot of crud build up here!

    Refit the brake pads, greasing the rears and metal shims to reduce squealing.

    TIP: If you are re-using pads, file a small ramp to the leading and trailing edge of the brake material, you can seriously reduce squealing. New pads have this feature as standard.

    Insert the retaining springs and anti rattle spring, again greasing the contact points.

    [​IMG]

    Repeat on the opposite side.

    Now you can adjust the handbrake cable to get the brakes biting at the correct point. I like quite a low handbrake (full on at 5 clicks) but, this is really down to personal preference, don't make it to high as this would be an MOT failure!

    Re-fit the heat shields, five the threads and bolts a coat of grease to allow easier removal next time.

    TIP: Your under the car with a tub of grease so its the perfect time to check and grease and bolts, nuts and brake pipes

    A good job done and one I repeat every 2 years or 20K miles to get every thing tip top.
     
  4. blotto_otto

    blotto_otto Vxon's car whore

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    Location:
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    Drives:
    Saab 93 1.9 Tid
    cracking how to and one i shall hopefully be following very shortly!
     
  5. FireEngineer

    FireEngineer New Member

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    Location:
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    If the brakes have not been serviced in a very long time, then it may be the case like mine that the internal pad adjustors are not working and the drum pads have bedded into a groove in the drum, thus making it impossable to det the disc off! Now I may be wrong here but the only option I can see is to cut the disk off with a grinder.
    The symptoms are the disk rotates on its own but when pulled moves only half an inch or so and then stops. No amount of pulling or hammering will shift it.
    Again this may be the case with brakes that are a long time un-serviced with high milage in between.
     
  6. glenis

    glenis Banned

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    Location:
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    absolutely fantastic guide

    superb detail and attention to detail also

    pure brilliance and a real guru (y)
     
  7. Dory

    Dory New Member

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    Location:
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    What is the minimum brake disk thickness for front and back brakes on a 2.0 litre Omega saloon?
     
  8. Rocketman

    Rocketman New Member

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    Location:
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    According to the Haynes manual:
    Front disk minimum thickness
    Up to 1998
    4 cyl ..... 21mm
    6 cyl ..... 25mm
    From 1998
    All models .. 25mm

    Rear disk minimum thickness
    All models .. 10mm

    BTW, my rear disks were also nearly impossible to get off. I enventually succeeded with a lot of hammering on a piece of wood placed behind the disk where the caliper normally goes. Sometimes the only way is brute force;) .
     
  9. Rocketman

    Rocketman New Member

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    Just to add, it IS possible to adjust the handbrake cable WITHOUT taking the heat shields off. Use a ratchet with long extension (or two) and a deep 13mm socket from behind. Reach round the front side to guide it. You have to do it more by feel than sight.

    Useful if like mine the heat shield bolts were completely rusted and sheared on undoing.
     
  10. gsi170

    gsi170 RWD hooner!!!

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    pics dead :(
     

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